Search results for: image-of-america-in-postwar-german-literature

The Image of America in Postwar German Literature

Author : Alfred L. Cobbs
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This study examines the German perception of America in postwar works of prose, drama, and non-fiction. In viewing works by Brecht, Frisch, Koeppen, Weiss, and others, against the traditional utopian picture of America popularized in the nineteenth century, Professor Cobbs shows how a critical image of the USA has evolved in response to America's economic and social structure. Particular emphasis is given to America's postwar role in world power politics.

Selected Studies on the Image of America in Post War German Literature

Author : Cobbs, Alfred Leon Cobbs
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Selected studies on the image of America in post war German literature

Author : Alfred Leon Cobbs
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Selected Studies on the Image of America in Post war German Literature

Author : Alfred L. Cobbs
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The Image of America in Postwar German Literature

Author : Alfred L. Cobbs
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This study examines the German perception of America in postwar works of prose, drama, and non-fiction. In viewing works by Brecht, Frisch, Koeppen, Weiss, and others, against the traditional utopian picture of America popularized in the nineteenth century, Professor Cobbs shows how a critical image of the USA has evolved in response to America's economic and social structure. Particular emphasis is given to America's postwar role in world power politics.

The German Student Movement and the Literary Imagination

Author : Susanne Rinner
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Through a close reading of novels by Ulrike Kolb, Irmtraud Morgner, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Bernhard Schlink, Peter Schneider, and Uwe Timm, this book traces the cultural memory of the 1960s student movement in German fiction, revealing layers of remembering and forgetting that go beyond conventional boundaries of time and space. These novels engage this contestation by constructing a palimpsest of memories that reshape readers' understanding of the 1960s with respect to the end of the Cold War, the legacy of the Third Reich, and the Holocaust. Topographically, these novels refute assertions that East Germans were isolated from the political upheaval that took place in the late 1960s and 1970s. Through their aesthetic appropriations and subversions, these multicultural contributions challenge conventional understandings of German identity and at the same time lay down claims of belonging within a German society that is more openly diverse than ever before.

The Image and Influence of America in German Poetry Since 1945

Author : Gregory Divers
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Examines the image of the US in German poetry and the reception and influence of American poetry in Germany since 1945.

Framed Visions

Author : Gerd Gemünden
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Emphasizes the fluid relationship between literature, cinema, and social life

East West and Others

Author : Arlene Akiko Teraoka
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East, West, and Others is the first work to examine the Third World in German literature from World War II to the present. Arlene A. Teraoka investigates how prominent post?World War II East and West German authors have portrayed the Third World. She discusses the persistent stereotypes of race, culture, and sexuality in texts by authors whose careers were shaped by concerns with Third World politics. Those writers include Anna Seghers, Peter Weiss, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, and Heiner M_ller; East Germans Claus Hammel and Peter Hacks; and the documentary West German writers Max von der Gr_n, G_nter Wallraff, and Paul Geiersbach. Teraoka demonstrates the continuing German need to construct a postwar identity freed from the fascist past and the conflicts and clichäs that inevitably mar this dream of the self. Whether authors project a champion of humanity who upholds Enlightenment ideals or a fragmented European protagonist paralyzed by guilt, all negotiate between the forces of rationality and prejudice, universality and difference, solidarity and helplessness.

Images of Germany in American Literature

Author : Waldemar Zacharasiewicz
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Although German Americans number almost 43 million and are the largest ethnic group in the United States, scholars of American literature have paid little attention to this influential and ethnically diverse cultural group. In a work of unparalleled depth and range, Waldemar Zacharasiewicz explores the cultural and historical background of the varied images of Germany and Germans throughout the past two centuries. Using an interdisciplinary approach known as comparative imagology, which borrows from social psychology and cultural anthropology, Zacharasiewicz samples a broad spectrum of original sources, including literary works, letters, diaries, autobiographical accounts, travelogues, newspaper reports, films, and even cartoons and political caricatures. Starting with the notion of Germany as the ideal site for academic study and travel in the nineteenth century and concluding with the twentieth-century image of Germany as an aggressive country, this innovative work examines the ever-changing image of Germans and Germany in the writings of Louisa May Alcott, Samuel Clemens, Henry James, William James, George Santayana, W. E. B. Du Bois, John Dewey, H. L. Mencken, Katherine Anne Porter, Kay Boyle, Thomas Wolfe, Upton Sinclair, Gertrude Stein, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, William Styron, Walker Percy, and John Hawkes, among others.

Enemy Images in American History

Author : Ragnhild Fiebig-von Hase
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Migrants Literature in Postwar Germany

Author : Alfred L. Cobbs
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This study discusses a selection of texts - by and about foreign migrants in the Federal Republic of Germany - in which the main characters assert their ethnic or cultural identity and/or oppositional political consciousness against that of the majority culture. Such an emphasis foregrounds the issues of "identity" and "citizenship", which are central to a discussion of whether and/or to what degree the Federal Republic has become a multi-cultural society since unification.

A User s Guide to German Cultural Studies

Author : Scott D. Denham
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Capitalizes on the ripeness of the German case for interdisciplinary investigation

The Image of Germany and the Germans in Erica Jong s Fear of Flying and Walter Abish s How German Is It

Author : Ulrike Miske
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Examination Thesis from the year 2007 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Comparative Literature, grade: 1,7, University of Paderborn, 67 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: During the last two centuries the American perception of Germany has periodically shifted as both countries have been rivals, friends, opponents and most recently allies. This has also been mirrored in the periodically changing American picture of Germany and the Germans, which over the years generated an abundance of stereotypes. While on the one hand, positive images have emerged such as the 'naturally virtuous and scholarly German, ' there have been, on the other hand, numerous negative generalizations, for example, the 'hard drinking and violent Teuton.' These notions were often formed through hearsay, personal experiences and encounters with Germans at home and abroad, through literature and political-social relations between the United States and Germany. They are often persistently maintained, have resisted any revision and are frequently regarded as the standard of thought. The role of American literature in creating, sustaining and perpetuating images continues to be of particular importance and this needs to be examined if one wishes to understand how a wide range of long-lasting German stereotypes came into existence. The images of Germany and the Germans which are projected in the works of numerous American writers, including Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Thomas Wolfe, Erica Jong and Walter Abish, have become core images found in travelogues, novels, poetry and short fiction. This thesis surveys the images of Germany and the Germans in American literature from the late 19th to the end of the 20th century, and proceeds to focus on two selected works: Walter Abish's How German is It (1980) and Erica Jong's Fear of Flying (1973). Abish's novel is a natural choice for an endeavor of this nature as it is both an extensive and intensive explorat

Germans and African Americans

Author : Larry A. Greene
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Germans and African Americans, unlike other works on African Americans in Europe, examines the relationship between African Americans and one country, Germany, in great depth. Germans and African Americans encountered one another within the context of their national identities and group experiences. In the nineteenth century, German immigrants to America and to such communities as Charleston and Cincinnati interacted within the boundaries of their old-world experiences and ideas and within surrounding regional notions of a nation fracturing over slavery. In the post-Civil War era in America through the Weimar era, Germany became a place to which African American entertainers, travelers, and intellectuals such as W. E. B. Du Bois could go to escape American racism and find new opportunities. With the rise of the Third Reich, Germany became the personification of racism, and African Americans in the 1930s and 1940s could use Hitler's evil example to goad America about its own racist practices. Postwar West Germany regained the image as a land more tolerant to African American soldiers than America. African Americans were important to Cold War discourse, especially in the internal ideological struggle between Communist East Germany and democratic West Germany. Unlike many other countries in Europe, Germany has played a variety of different and conflicting roles in the African American narrative and relationship with Europe. It is this diversity of roles that adds to the complexity of African American and German interactions and mutual perceptions over time.

Conceptions of Postwar German Masculinity

Author : Roy Jerome
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Examines masculinity in German culture, society, and literature from 1945 to the present.

A Picture Held Us Captive

Author : Tea Lobo
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While there are publications on Wittgenstein’s interest in Dostoevsky’s novels and the recurring mentions of Wittgenstein in Sebald’s works, there has been no systematic scholarship on the relation between perception (such as showing and pictures) and the problem of an adequate presentation of interiority (such as intentions or pain) for these three thinkers.This relation is important in Wittgenstein’s treatment of the subject and in his private language argument, but it is also an often overlooked motif in both Dostoevsky’s and Sebald’s works. Dostoevsky’s depiction of mindset discrepancies in a rapidly modernizing Russia can be analyzed interms of multi-aspectivity. The theatricality of his characters demonstrates especially well Wittgenstein’s account of interiority's interrelatedness with overt public practices and codes. In Sebald’s Austerlitz, Wittgenstein’s notion of family resemblances is an aesthetic strategy within the novel. Visual tropes are most obviously present in Sebald's use of photography, and can partially be read as an ethical-aesthetic imperative of rendering pain visible. Tea Lobo's book contributes towards a non-Cartesian account of literary presentations of inner life based on Wittgenstein's thought.

German American Relations and German Culture in America

Author : Arthur R. Schultz
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This "work is organized by subject. Materials are grouped under twelve main sections in the body of the work, with appropriate subdivisions and subtopics within each main subject. Each section is assigned a two-letter designation, and entries are numbered consecutively within each section. This subject code system was designed to facilitate referals from the Index to the main body of the text, and to allow for cross-referencing between sections."--Introduction.

The image of Germany and the Germans in Erica Jong s Fear of Flying and Walter Abish s How German Is It

Author : Ulrike Miske
File Size : 41.96 MB
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Examination Thesis from the year 2007 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Comparative Literature, grade: 1,7, University of Paderborn, 67 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: During the last two centuries the American perception of Germany has periodically shifted as both countries have been rivals, friends, opponents and most recently allies. This has also been mirrored in the periodically changing American picture of Germany and the Germans, which over the years generated an abundance of stereotypes. While on the one hand, positive images have emerged such as the ‘naturally virtuous and scholarly German,’ there have been, on the other hand, numerous negative generalizations, for example, the ‘hard drinking and violent Teuton.’ These notions were often formed through hearsay, personal experiences and encounters with Germans at home and abroad, through literature and political-social relations between the United States and Germany. They are often persistently maintained, have resisted any revision and are frequently regarded as the standard of thought. The role of American literature in creating, sustaining and perpetuating images continues to be of particular importance and this needs to be examined if one wishes to understand how a wide range of long-lasting German stereotypes came into existence. The images of Germany and the Germans which are projected in the works of numerous American writers, including Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Thomas Wolfe, Erica Jong and Walter Abish, have become core images found in travelogues, novels, poetry and short fiction. This thesis surveys the images of Germany and the Germans in American literature from the late 19th to the end of the 20th century, and proceeds to focus on two selected works: Walter Abish’s How German is It (1980) and Erica Jong’s Fear of Flying (1973). Abish’s novel is a natural choice for an endeavor of this nature as it is both an extensive and intensive exploration of images attributed to German identity. Jong’s novel, on the other hand, is an exploration of individual identity in a German setting and has been selected because of its enormous role in the relatively new field of women’s studies.

International Books in Print

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